It’s Roundup time

Thursday, September 25, 2014


By Charley Najacht

It’s that time of the year again when the roaming buffalo in Custer State Park will be rounded up, sorted and vaccinated.
For the second year in a row, the roundup will take place the morning of the last Friday in September, the 26th.
Visitors to the 49th annual roundup may arrive at the north or south viewing areas as early as 6:15 a.m. when the parking lots open, until 9 a.m. when the lots close.
The actual roundup starts about 9:30 a.m. Guests must stay in the viewing areas until the herd is in the corrals, generally around noon.
From about 1-3 p.m. visitors may observe the buffalo being tested, branded and sorted in the corrals.
For the first time, the big Arts Festival in the park will begin at noon Friday, giving roundup viewers the first crack at the vendor booths.
The Arts Festival will continue Saturday, Sept. 27, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 28, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The 25th annual Buffalo Wallow Chili Cookoff will be held in the arts festival area Sunday, Sept. 28, beginning at 1 p.m. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m.
Spectators purchase chili tastes and then vote for the People’s Choice Award.
Crazy Horse Memorial will host its second fall Volksmarch to the top of the world’s largest mountain carving Sunday, Sept. 28, and Monday, Sept. 29.
Registration for the 6.2 mile event begins at 8 a.m. both days and closes at 1 p.m. Hikers must register at the starting point. The trail closes at 4 p.m.
This is the second time this year that the general public will have the opportunity to climb the trail to the top of the mountain. The first Volksmarch of the year  is held annually the first weekend in June.
Approximately 1,300 buffalo will be rounded up for the Friday morning event. About 300 of the animals are sorted and sold at the annual auction later in November. Money from the sale is used to help fund the day-to-day operations of the state park system.
The purpose of the annual roundup is the keep the park’s bison population at a sustainable level with the available grassland forage.
Normally, the park can support about 1,000 bison over the winter.
Buyers from all over the country and Canada have bought bison at the park auction and started herds of their own.

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Black Hills treasure comes to life



Last week those who have been involved in the restoration project on the Gold Mountain gathered with the general public at the mine site to celebrate the completion of the project, the latest thing being an interpretive trail and signs. From left are, Lynn Kolund, retired Hell Canyon District Ranger, Black Hills National Forest (BHNF); Matt Padilla, Hell Canyon Ranger District archaeologist, BHNF; Laura Floyd, chair of Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission; Kevin Kuchenbecker, Deadwood Historic Preservation officer; Skip Tillisch, Black Hills Historic Preservation Trust president; Michael Salisbury, former Mystic Ranger District archaeologist, BHNF; Craig Bobzien, BHNF supervisor; Bob Thompson, former Mystic District Ranger, BHNF. [Submitted Photo/JON CRANE]


By Carol Walker

Nearly a century ago, men sought to extract gold from the earth at the Gold Mountain Mine near Hill City, but last Tuesday when a crowd gathered in that same location they saw a treasure rivaling the value of gold. They celebrated the preservation of a piece of local history, the restoration of the Gold Mountain mill frame, the last standing structure of its kind in the Black Hills. The signs along the interpretive trail tell the story of the mine.
Skip Tillisch, president of the Black Hills Historic Preservation Trust, was elated by how far the restoration project has come since its inception.
“I think it turned out really well. We are very pleased with the outcome of this project,” said Tillisch.
According to Tillisch, in 2007, Forest Service personnel took a group people to the mine on one of the summer “Moon Walks” thinking it mgiht be the last glimpse people would get of a structure that could be seen nowhere else in the Black Hills. The Forest Service did not have the money or the staff to restore and maintain projects such as the Gold Mountain Mine.
Larry McCaskell, former owner of High Country Guest Ranch, put out flyers on garbage cans in the area advertising a meeting with the Forest Service about the mine. Tillisch said 18 people showed up to listen and then ponder, “What could be done to preserve the mine?” Out of that meeting came the Black Hills Historic Preservation Trust (BHHPT), a not-for-profit 501c3, a group of people committed to holding on to places and structures that communicate our local history.

Available only in the print version of the Hill City Prevailer News. To subscribe, call 605-574-2538.

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Unseen things are often critical

By Carol Walker


This morning while I was out for a walk, I watched the garbage truck back in toward the dumpster at  Slate Creek Grille, preparing to empty its contents. These guys get up at the crack of dawn to travel their route to homes and businesses. What if they didn’t stop and the garbage overflowed? It wouldn’t make a very good impression on restaurant patrons and it would reflect negatively on the owners.
What if wait staff at a restaurant set the table with even one food-encrusted fork because the dishwasher in back wasn’t doing his job, or the waiter or waitress wasn’t paying attention to detail? The customer might leave or at least decide not to return to the restaurant again, all because of a moment of negligence.
I had a summer job at a resort where I did everything from making pizzas to cleaning cabins. The owner conducted a random inspection while I was cleaning a cabin and pointed out the fact that I hadn’t polished the faucets on the bathroom sink. A small thing? No, it was pretty important because it was a reflection on his establishment and it would have made a difference to the next guests who stayed in the cabin.
These jobs aren’t glamorous and they are behind the scenes, but, oh, so important. Individuals who perform service type jobs are often forgotten, but they deserve our thanks.


Available only in the print version of the Hill City Prevailer News. To subscribe, call 605-574-2538.

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Dale S. Simmons



Dale S. Simmons of Keystone, S.D., was born on a farm near Parkston, S.D, to Chandes and Amanda (Hoffman) Simmons on March 9, 1931.
He was raised on the farm and after graduating from Parkston High School, he attended Huron College for two years before enlisting in the U. S. Army. After his honorable discharge, Dale returned to Huron College and finished his degree.
Dale married Joan Bottger in Clark on Sept. 2, 1955, just celebrating 59 years of marriage.
He joined an insurance firm before purchasing a farm near Joan’s parents near Carpenter, S.D. He returned to insurance, retiring as a district manager for North Star Mutual.
Dale and Joan moved to Keystone in 1995, where they built their home in the woods, enjoying the beauty every day.
Dale enjoyed participating in sports and watching his children and grandchildren play sports. He enjoyed camping with the family, hunting and fishing with his sons, playing golf and reading.
Simmons, passed away at his home surrounded by his family on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. He was 83 years old.
Dale is survived by his wife, Joan, Keystone; children, Lynette Simmons, Chehalis, Wash., Doug (Paulette) Simmons, Great Falls, Mont., Brad (Wendy) Simmons, Keystone, and Kelli (Randy) Diede, Huron; eight grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a brother, Dean Simmons, Parkston; sisters, Darlene (Bill) Juhnke, Parkston, and Mavis Pribyl, Olympia, Wash.
A visitation was held Sunday, Sept. 21, at Serenity Spring Funeral Chapel and funeral services were on Monday, Sept. 22, at Serenity Springs Funeral Chapel with Pastor Kent Bryant officiating.
Interment with military honors was at Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis.
A memorial has been established to the Keystone EMT, the Hayward Volunteer Fire Dept. and the Pennington County Search and Rescue..
Friends may sign his online guest register at www.serenityspringsfuneralchapel.com.

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Inez Cardamon


Inez Cardamon was born Oct. 7, 1922, on her parents’, Anna Marie (Monson) and Louis Anker, homestead near Van Metre, S.D.
She received her elementary education at Monson School and was confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church in 1937, both sites located near her home on property donated by her grandfather, Iver Monson.
Inez attended high school at Murdo, S.D., and Draper, S.D., finishing her final year in Tacoma, Wash.  In 1943, she married Bernie Reit and they resided in Des Moines, Iowa. After Bernie died in 1962, Inez married Louis Cardamon.
Inez and Louis moved to Rosemead, Calif., where they operated a small business. After retiring they resided in Hemet, Calif.; Bella Vista, Ark., and Hill City, S.D. Louis passed away in 2002, and to be near family, Inez moved to Murdo in 2011. Due to failing health, she moved to Mary House in Pierre, S.D., in January 2014.
Inez Cardamon died at Maryhouse Long Term Care Facility in Pierre on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. She was 91 years old.
She was preceded in death by her parents, husbands and siblings, Mildred Rust, Doris Miller and Mons Anker.
She is survived by her brother, Leonard (Maryann) Anker, both of Rapid City, S.D.; brother-in-law, Delmer Miller of Rapid City; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Committal services were held at Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis, S.D., on Thursday, Sept. 18.
Written condolences may be made at mccolleyschapels.com.

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New faces at Hill City Elementary

By Carol Walker

When school began a few weeks ago, several new staff members joined the ranks at Hill City Elementary School. Lisa Hamilton, Hillary Jastorff, Laura Jacobson, Whitney Kemink and Bobbie Morrison began the year in various classrooms and Cheryl DeVeny will be in the classroom by Oct. 1.
Hamilton is working in the special education department at Hill City, having graduated from Black Hills State University last May with an Early Childhood/Special Education degree. She previously served as a paraprofessional and decided to go back to further her own education.
“I have always loved working with kids. I worked in the district as a paraprofessional and immediately fell in love with the job. I enrolled right away and began my degree,” said Hamilton.
As the school year begins she is excited to be back working with children and is looking forward to the challenges the school year will bring. Another positive about working in Hill City is she is close to her husband, Rick Hamilton, a high school math teacher.
The couple has three children. The older two are in second and fourth grades and the youngest will attend kindergarten in the fall of 2015.
In a similar situation, Jastorff has a spouse in the Hill City School System, in the same building. Her husband, Luke, is a first grade teacher, and the couple has two children, a 2 1/2-year-old and a 2-month-old baby.

Available only in the print version of the Hill City Prevailer News. To subscribe, call 605-574-2538.

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Chew-Choo BBQ Sept. 21 in Hill City

Thursday, September 18, 2014


It is all about the food, music and trains at the South Dakota State Railroad Museum’s Chew-Choo BBQ and Concert on Sunday, Sept. 21.

Free museum admission plus family games and activities for ticket holders will begin at 1 p.m., with the afternoon’s main activities under the big tent (rain or shine) starting at 3 p.m. with the music of noted South Dakota musicians Hank Harris and Kenny Putnam. The duo will perform some of their favorite music, plus put a special spin on railroad classics from several eras. The performance is co-sponsored by the South Dakota Arts Council.

The barbecue meal featuring beef brisket, pork and all the trimmings will begin at about 3:30 p.m., with silent auction items for viewing and bidding available until 5 p.m., with the announcement of winning bids at 6 p.m.

The live auction will take place at 5:45 p.m. Contemporary Black Hills impressionist artist Dede Farrar will donate one half of the sale price for her original acrylic painting entitled “Prairie Flight”—a study of a red-tailed hawk hovering ahead of a train.

“I let the work speak for itself—I want to create pieces that are uplifting and positive,” Farrar said.

Other art, railroad memorabilia and specialty items will be auctioned to benefit the museum.

A partial list of event co-sponsors includes the Rapid City, Pierre and Eastern Railroad; South Dakota Wheat Growers; BNSF Railway; Duhamel Broadcasting, Great Western Tire and Action Mechanical.

“The barbecue is planned as a very casual afternoon of great food, music, auction fun, and other family activities to showcase and promote all of the year-round programs going on at the museum,” said Charlie Johnson, museum vice-chair and coordinator of the event.

Attendees will also be able to visit with the museum’s staff and its board of directors. Johnson will also announce the details of a special raffle for a one-of-a-kind Canadian railroad passenger adventure at 6 p.m.

Tickets may be purchased in advance for $25 per person ($30 day of event), with kids 10 and under free when accompanied by paid adult admissions. More information and tickets available from Rick Mills at 574-9000 or at www.sdsrm.org.

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